Computer science and education are making headlines nearly every day. Why? Without computer science, students will not be ready to take on the jobs of tomorrow. 

Today, a distinguished group of bi-partisan governors, educators, and Fortune 100 CEOs, including our own chairman and CEO, Randall Stephenson, sent an open letter to Congress asking for federal funding to provide every student in every school the opportunity to learn computer science. According to the letter, organized by the Computer Science Education Coalition in collaboration with Code.org, 90% of parents want their children to have access to computer science education at school, and teachers agree. However, three-quarters of U.S. schools do not offer meaningful computer science courses.

It’s important that schools give all students the opportunity to understand how technology works, and how they can play a part in its creation. That’s why through AT&T Aspire, we’re supporting organizations that equip young people to be the next creators, coders and makers. We’re joining the Computer Science Education Coalition and teaming up with Code.org, as well as 100kin10, Girls Who Code, Teach For America’s CS@TFA and many others to help students develop computer science and coding skills, and close the gender gap in the science and engineering sectors.

With the support of Congress, educators, the business community and organizations like the ones listed above, we can unlock the potential of students across the country to carry on the next generation of innovation in America.  Learn more about this effort, and how to support it here

About the Author

Anne Wintroub

Director of Social Innovation, AT&T

Anne_Wintroub

Anne Wintroub is a Director of Social Innovation at AT&T. She is located in San Francisco.

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