Every year, we see new inventions that solve problems and entertain. 2017 brought us a smartphone with face recognition, an electric vehicle for the masses and a stress-relieving toy everyone from your 5-year-old to your grandmother was obsessed with, seemingly overnight.

Do you know a budding young builder, maker or scientist? Encourage them to submit their best and brightest ideas for this year’s Inventor’s Challenge. The month-long challenge starts Feb. 1 and closes Feb 28.

It also brought us “the Switch Shelf” – a multi-purpose cane to help improve the life of older people. It comes complete with a flashlight and shoehorn (among other helpful things). If you haven’t heard of that last one, it’s probably because you don’t know about the Inventor’s Challenge. But we’re hoping to change that!

For the third year, we’re partnering with Imagination.org on the Inventor’s Challenge. We’re calling young people from around the world to create innovative and imaginative solutions that solve problems in their schools and communities. 

Their inventions can be anything they dream of, as long as it incorporates STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and math). Last year, we saw entries from nearly 10,000 kids and teens from pre-k to high school.

Imagination.org

Through the Inventor’s Challenge, we’ve watched children make their vision come to life and embrace their entrepreneurial side.

Creations have included a device that detects excessive stress on structures and alerts emergency services, “sky shoes” to help people reach those way-too-high items and a mobile app designed to help individuals with disabilities navigate their community.

Each year, I’m inspired by the passion from young people across the globe to help make their communities a better place. They can change the world. 

Do you know a budding young builder, maker or scientist? Encourage them to submit their best and brightest ideas for this year’s Inventor’s Challenge. The month-long challenge starts Feb. 1 and closes Feb 28.

Throughout the month, young inventors will share their creations in their schools, neighborhoods and online.

Some of the greatest inventions in history – including braille, earmuffs and even the television – were first dreamt of and created by children. I can’t wait to see what’s next from these incredible young people and I’m so excited to see their innovations over the next month!

About the Author

Anne Wintroub

Anne_Wintroub

Anne Wintroub is a Director of Social Innovation at AT&T. She is located in San Francisco

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